13 of your Favourite Afri-love Posts in 2013

13-Most-Popular-Afri-love-Posts-of-2013

 

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank you all for reading these posts and engaging with me. I'm so happy that this blog has given me a platform to meet so many incredible people; to be continuously inspired and; to share the sometimes tough, but always enlightening, lessons that business and life in general throw my way. I look forward to more great discoveries and learning, new relationships and further exchange in 2014!

For this year's round-up, I've decided to do things a little bit different and feature the posts that were most popular each month. Enjoy.

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Great Girls in African Literature that Your Daughter Should Know

Great-Girls-in-African-Literature

This post was inspired by a one entitled "Great Girls Your Daughter Should Know (Before She Reads Twilight)" by Molly of the blog, Molly Makes Do, recommending strong, relatable female characters. While Molly's list does indeed include some inspiring heroines that I recall from reading lists in my youth, it's missing the diversity that girls from world literature can offer us. My contribution to filling that gap is the following list of great girls and young women, from African literature, that all girls, young and old, should get to know. 

 

In alphabetical order:

  1. Beatrice from Anthills of the Savannah by Chinua Achebe
  2. Dikeledi from The Collector of Treasures by Bessie Head
  3. Kainene from Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  4. Mhudi from Mhudi by Sol T. Plaatje
  5. Nyasha and Tambu from Nervous Conditions (and Tambu again in The Book of Not) by Tsitsi Dangaremba
  6. Phephelaphi from Butterfly Burning by Yvonne Vera
  7. Sissie from Our Sister Killjoy by Ama Ata Aidoo
  8. Efuru from Efuru by Flora Nwapa (thanks for sharing Belinda!)

 

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The First Ever International Day of the Girl & Other Good Stuff for Girls

International Day of the Girl October 11 2012 Egypt Pyramids Pink

Yesterday I had the honour of celebrating the first every International Day of the Girl with hundreds of amazing women and girls at London's Southbank Centre. I was one of a group of around 180 mentors including physicists, authors, fashion designers, airline pilots, radio presenters, Team GB olympians, entrepreneurs, reverends, activists, bloggers and more – a very diverse and interesting group of women! We mentored 11-18 year olds while on the London Eye. Elsewhere in the world, nations showed their solidarity with girls by turning their landmarks pink (including the pyramids in Egypt).

 

Because I am a Girl

The event was related to the Women of the World (WOW) festival which you'll have read me go on about earlier this year. It was driven by charity Plan UK who are campaigning for the education of girls to be a top development priority (you can find out more about Because I am a Girl and sign their petition).

For the occassion, I thought I'd share some other girl-dedicated initiatives:

 

The Girl Effect

The Girl Effect is a MOVEMENT. It's about about ending poverty. And it's about doing so by investing in girls: "The Girl Effect is about girls. And boys. And moms and dads and villages and towns and countries"

 

 View more great Girl Effect videos.

 

Afri-Girl

Here's a girl (a woman actually) I know who's on a mission to inspire girls and young women in Kenya that they can pursue their dream careers with confidence. Afri-girl aims to open girls up to the opportunities available to them by sharing the stories of those who have gone for it already.

Watch this space for more.

 

Parting words

I had a few interesting discussions yesterday, about feminism, activism and an observed apathy towards pushing for change. It's been the theme of my week actually. We get frustrated about things and sometimes we ignore the things we wish were different, sometimes we just complain but, why don't we get up and DO? Why don't we act on creating the change we want? I've been reflecting about how I can be more active in the interest of the things that I stand for.

What's been frustrating you lately?

Pyramids photo 

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