Inspired fabrics from Proud Mary

Proud Mary cushions

I just discovered Proud Mary (via Design*Sponge), a company that believes in the power of design to solve problems. Working with artisan cooperatives in developing nations, in the spirit of beneficial exchange of ideas and resources, Proud Mary markets unique handcrafted patterned goods. They're ticking all the sustainability boxes (people, planet, profit)!

Image from their South Africa collection. 

 

Week in review

Week-in-review-gr-purp

Last week was another busy one on the blog with Afri-inspiration coming from all angles. The new interview series continued with two really energizing interviews with young Africans doing great things for the advancement of our continent.

A round-up of posts incase you missed any:

A huge thanks to you for taking the time to read and share comments, facebook appreciation and tweet love. Remember, you can also get updates via facebooktwitter and you can also subscribe to the Afri-love feed.

Feedback is incredibly useful to me so, please drop me a line with any comments, suggestions, ideas etc.

This coming week, look out for:

  • Quote of the week
  • Africa on film in London town
  • An esteemed African graphic agitator whose uses design as a torch of social good
  • Foxy African-inspired adornment 
  • Interviews with more passionate young Africans doing big things
  • A celebration for Equatorial Guinea's Independence Day
  • Reflections on food and the things we take for granted
  • TGIF! A Fela extravaganza to celebrate the legend's birthday

Have a fantastic week! Be proud and be inspired.

Lulu
:) 

 

Humanitarian design and imperialism

Design-imperialism

Interesting article by Bruce Nussbaum discussing humanitarian design and imperialism.

An excerpt:  
"But should we take a moment now that the movement is gathering speed to ask whether or not American and European designers are collaborating with the right partners, learning from the best local people, and being as sensitive as they might to the colonial legacies of the countries they want to do good in. Do designers need to better see themselves through the eyes of the local professional and business classes who believe their countries are rising as the U.S. and Europe fall and wonder who, in the end, has the right answers? Might Indian, Brazilian and African designers have important design lessons to teach Western designers?"

And a response to his article suggests:

"The worst thing to do patronize low-income earners by succumbing to nationalistic and inward-looking design. Lets keep sharing, exchanging, and working together and enable the best designs to play out, regardless of origin."

Thanks to @whiteafrican for tweeting the links!