Great Girls in African Literature that Your Daughter Should Know

Great-Girls-in-African-Literature

This post was inspired by a one entitled "Great Girls Your Daughter Should Know (Before She Reads Twilight)" by Molly of the blog, Molly Makes Do, recommending strong, relatable female characters. While Molly's list does indeed include some inspiring heroines that I recall from reading lists in my youth, it's missing the diversity that girls from world literature can offer us. My contribution to filling that gap is the following list of great girls and young women, from African literature, that all girls, young and old, should get to know. 

 

In alphabetical order:

  1. Beatrice from Anthills of the Savannah by Chinua Achebe
  2. Dikeledi from The Collector of Treasures by Bessie Head
  3. Kainene from Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  4. Mhudi from Mhudi by Sol T. Plaatje
  5. Nyasha and Tambu from Nervous Conditions (and Tambu again in The Book of Not) by Tsitsi Dangaremba
  6. Phephelaphi from Butterfly Burning by Yvonne Vera
  7. Sissie from Our Sister Killjoy by Ama Ata Aidoo
  8. Efuru from Efuru by Flora Nwapa (thanks for sharing Belinda!)

 

Continue reading “Great Girls in African Literature that Your Daughter Should Know”

Inspired: Chinua Achebe Book Covers

1 Chinua-Achebe-Things-Fall-Apart-A-Man-of-the-People

 

Since Chinua Achebe's passing last Thursday, my Facebook feed has been inundated with great quotes from the inspirational writer. There is a particular statement that I love and that resonates so perfectly with philosophy behind this blog:

"Nobody can teach me who I am. You can describe parts of me, but who I am, and what I need, is something I have to find out myself.”

Chinua Achebe's literary works inspired great book cover designs and this post showcases some of my favourites. 

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Quote of the week – keeping it local

A-man-of-the-people

"If the herb we seek in the bush grows in the very backyard, are we not saved a journey?"

— from Chinua Achebe's A Man of the People

This week I'm going to try to be especially conscious of looking inward rather than outward for all things.

(I'm digging the book cover design above! It so well captures the era that the book is set in. I did not enjoy this sequel to Things Fall Apart as much as I have other Achebe books but, it is worth reading, if at least to understand that particular moment in our history, from the individual's perspective and experience.)